1. Export as PDF. Click to send a PDF of your 360 results to the email address associated with your account.

  2. Details and Invitees tabs. Click to view 360 feedback details and a list of colleagues invited to participate, respectively.

  3. Strengths. This is a high-level summary of the items in the 360 that were rated highest by assessors. Strengths are listed in descending order by rating. To qualify as a strength, the average rating must be at least 4 out of 5.

  4. Hidden Strengths. Individual items in the 360 are identified as hidden strengths if one’s self-rating for this item is lower than the average colleague rating by at least 0.75, and the average colleague rating is greater than 4 out 5.

  5. Challenges. This is a high-level summary of the items in the 360 that were rated lowest by assessors. Challenges are listed in ascending order by rating (i.e., lowest item first, then the second lowest, etc.). To qualify as a challenge, the average rating must be no higher than 4 out of 5.

  6. Hidden Opportunities. Individual items in the 360 are identified as hidden opportunities if one’s self-rating for this item is higher than the average colleague rating by at least 0.75, and the average colleague rating is lower than 3.75 out of 5.

  7. Score Comparison by Domain. This section compares self-assessment ratings to colleagues ratings across leadership domains. It displays the gaps and/or alignment between the participants’ and colleagues’ perceptions.


8. Details. Click the Details link to view detailed results.

9. Average Score By Relationship. For each leadership domain, when the 360 results are released the system creates an average score for an individual’s self-rating and average rating from their colleagues.

In some cases, this average score is broken down by colleague category (i.e., peer, manager, direct report). However, most engagements use an average of all colleagues. This configuration is determined by each organization.

Sometimes individuals rate themselves higher than their colleagues, some lower than their colleagues, and some similar to their colleagues. Whatever the case, the feedback should be used to create learning goals and a development plan.

If your organization is using the Torch Leadership Assessment, it may be helpful to learn more about each of the Torch Leadership Domains here.

10. Individual Statements. When expanded, users can see how they rated themselves against their colleagues by individual statement.

11. Written Feedback. In addition to providing feedback on each statement within each domain, respondents may be asked to provide Written Feedback to specific questions (for example: What is the most important challenge that they need to address to grow as a leader?)

This written, or qualitative, feedback adds valuable context to the 360 scores, and provides a foundation upon which to create learning goals that will be of greatest impact for growth.

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